Food

Eats From The Streets.

Food Markets

Few things tell the story better than street food. You can easily e inspired by delectable street foods from far-flung locales such as Japan, Thailand, Italy, Eastern and Central Europe, North African countries, and Mexico.

Street food, aka truck food is the new rage in big North American cities with high-density downtown cores.

It is sold from carts, or trucks, or by ambulant people who buy and sell food, or, in oriental countries, specially allocated places with fixed booths. (Some even offer cramped seating).

By necessity, street food id “finger food” wrapped, or in sandwich from although French fries may be served with plastic cutlery and mayonnaise, instead of ketchup or malt vinegar. In the orient people like to eat with their fingers and street food vendor with booths offer rice with various liquid foods.

Street food stalls enjoy great popularity in Far Eastern countries. In Japan, on street corners, you can buy grilled squids, or in others, eat in stalls that produce one or two specialties.

Most work from 5 p m to midnight and the majority follow their own recipes that are famous with locals. Recently, a lady in Singapore wanted to sell her famous stall including her recipes and was asking for more than a million Hong Kong $ ( 1 HK $ = US $ .08). In northern Europe, street food vendors locate their carts on busy street corners or in nightclub quarters. Some sell grilled sausages, others French fried potatoes with mayonnaise, yet others, crepes, or panini-style sandwiches.

In the USA, New York New Orleans, San Francisco and many other cities offer street food. Of late, food trucks have become all the rage in both USA and Canada, but only in big cities.

The first food truck-like contraption was a chuck wagon that catered to cattlemen driving their cattle in season to pastures. It was established by Charles Goodnight n 1866, out of necessity to feed cowboys.

Since then, many different designs came on the market, the latest of which may have deep fryers, powerful ovens, small electric ranges, microwave ovens, and refrigerators.

There are catering trucks that travel from one construction site to another selling sandwiches, cookies, coffee, or tea, soft drinks, and some, even small pies that are rethermalized in microwave ovens.

During summer days, city parks attract ice cream trucks.

Now, some food truck operators specialize in a few specialties – pizzas with various toppings, chicken wings, lobster rolls, fish tacos, schnitzel in a bun, risotto rice balls, smoked salmon plates, BLT sandwich, toasted ravioli, BBQ or pulled chicken, bruschetta, freshly shucked oysters, cheese sandwiches, vegetarian wraps, pappas rellenos with aji picante.

Street food can be delicious, and in most cases is much less expensive than take-out or restaurants, but you must select the supplier carefully with regard to cleanliness, and location (close to a park with benches).

Street food can be inspiring and fun.

Try it to discover for yourself.

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2 Comments

  1. I don’t take street foods for one reason: I don’t trust their cleanliness. I have seen how some of the people that make the street foods conduct themselves in terms of cleanliness and I just didn’t like it.
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  2. I like to take street foods, it’s so testy and healthy food. Some don’t know about it but japan, America also like steet food.