Wine

Modern Rosé Wines.

Rosé WinesModern Rosé Wines

Once considered sweet, fringe, and “effeminate” wines, they have now been embraced by trendsetters in all their stylish varieties.

Traditionally, Provence (southern France) produced remarkable rosé wines that match the local food and living-style with outdoor cafes, al fresco dining, casual clothing, in short carefree living in paradisiacal landscape.

Modern rosé wines range from delicately sweet to bracingly dry in a parade of pinks from palest coral to bright flamingo and short of red.

Rosé wines are food friendly for every palate and every plate, and please crowds before lunch or dinner. Most are 12 – 13 per cent ABV. Some are sparkling ad can be fun to serve as an aperitif with a few unsalted roasted nuts.

Rosé wines

can be made using several techniques –

a) blending white and red (usually resulting in uninspiring wines; b) during red wine production removing a portion of the juice after a short period; c) removing the skins of the fermenting juice after a short fermentation and then continuing with the process.

Grenache (garnacha) is the preferred grape for rose wines in France and Spain, but other grapes such ad cabernet sauvignon, carmenere, merlot, shiraz, gamay, malbec are used in some countries.

Argentinean winemakers like malbec, Chileans carmenere, Australians shiraz. In Ontario cabernet sauvignon, or merlot are preferred.

Fruity, balanced, and elegant rose wines can be served successfully with smoked salmon on chips, or spaghetti with roasted peppers, plum tomatoes, goat cheese, and fresh basil, pan-seared Thai beef of a bed of rice noodles, poached trout, pan-fried trout, and skewered grilled lamb.

Here are some fine rose wines you can try;

La Vieille Ferme Rose, Cote du Rhone, France
Quinta do Lagoalva de Cima, Portugal
Quivira Grenache Dry, Dry Creek valley, Sonoma County, California
Tavel, Les Vignerons de Tavel, Cote du Rhone, France
Chateau d’Aquirea, Cotes du Rhone, France
Chateau Vignelaure, Coteaux Aix en Provence
Dame Rousse, Domaine de la Mordore, Cote du Rhone, France
Sangiovese Mudgee Rose, Robert Oatley, Australia
Cotes de Provence Rose Ott Selection, Cotes de Provence, France
Languedoc Rose, Hecht et Bannier, Languedoc, France
Douro Rose, Quinta da Rosa, Douro, Portugal
Costieres des Nimes Rose Tradition, Mas des Bressades, France
Sangiovese Rose, Waterbrook, Washington State
Rose d’Anjou, Remy Pannier, Loire, France
Rosado Sangre de Toro, Torres, Spain
Bandol Rose Romassan, Domaine Ott, Provence, France
Rose Paso Robles, Tablas Creek, California

 

One Comment

  1. Now I know how Rose wines are made. Thanks for posting this one. Great blog. Great wine selection by the way! Cheers!