Travel

How to Select the Best Seats in an Aircraft.

seats

Millions of people fly daily for short or long distances.

Although flying these days requires lengthy security checks, still it is the fastest way to travel for far destinations.

Aircraft come in different sizes and configurations. Some are old and poorly maintained, others are the newest and most modern designs produced in the USA, Russia, Brazil, Canada, and a consortium of European countries.

Aircraft design and production are highly specialized fields,capital intensive and require competent, meticulous labour.

When flying long distances, passengers like to have pleasant or quiet or compatible seatmates. A few service-oriented airlines try to match passengers according to information provided.

The safest seats in an aircraft, regardless of design and manufacturer, are the first and last five rows.

Worse seats are those next to the washrooms due constant traffic and possible off odours.

The most quiet seats are the first six rows, usually reserved for first class passengers.

If you want more legroom, consult seatguru.com or skytrax.com. Some airlines provide very little legroom, but on every aircraft there are a few rows with a few centimetres/inches more legroom. If you ask the ticket agent may be nice enough to give you one.

If you want the fastest food service, select the first few rows in each price category, i.e economy, business, or first class.

Should you wish to take a nap during the flight say Los Angeles to Auckland, Los Angeles to Sydney, seats of the few tail rows are best.

If you are scared of turbulence or air pockets, select a seat in the middle of the aircraft.

And if you are superstitious, most airlines avoid row number 13 in their aircrafts.

Should you be claustrophobic, the last rows in an aircraft will give you the feeling of more space.

Happy flying!

 

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2 Comments

  1. I’m picking the middle part of the plane,for me to avoid dizziness,and,well, playing safe:)

  2. This information is helpful, but what I want to know most before flying is whether or not I will get an on-demand TV in the back of my seat. I have an exponentially better time when I do, but I’m not sure if there’s a way to tell by looking at the plane’s make, model and production year.
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